Apple Maggot Fly Speciation Examples

  • Apple maggot - Wikipedia
  • Hybridization and the spread of the apple maggot fly ...
  • All Hail the Apple Maggot! - The New York Times
  • Rhagoletis pomonella
  • Speciation in the apple maggot fly: a blend of vintages?
  • Apple maggot - Wikipedia

    The apple maggot (Rhagoletis pomonella), also known as the railroad worm (but distinct from the Phrixothrix beetle larva, also called railroad worm), is a species of fruit fly, and a pest of several types of fruits, mainly apples.This species evolved about 150 years ago through a sympatric shift from the native host hawthorn to the domesticated apple species Malus domestica in the northeastern ... The full power of modern genetics has been applied to the study of speciation in only a small handful of genetic model species - all of which speciated allopatrically. Here we report the first large expressed sequence tag (EST) study of a candidate for ecological sympatric speciation, the apple maggot Rhagoletis pomonella, using massively parallel pyrosequencing on the Roche 454-FLX platform ...

    Apple maggot fly: How an altered sense of smell could ...

    National Centre for Biological Sciences. (2017, January 25). Apple maggot fly: How an altered sense of smell could drive the formation of new species. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 7, 2020 from ... The Apple Maggot fly (adult form) Another example of sympatric speciation through habitat differentiation that has occurred within the last few hundred years has involved the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella. This species is native to North America, where it breeds in the fruit of Hawthorn trees. Females lay their eggs on Hawthorn fruit ...

    Hybridization and the spread of the apple maggot fly ...

    Hybridization may be an important process interjecting variation into insect populations enabling host plant shifts and the origin of new economic pests. Here, we examine whether hybridization between the native snowberry-infesting fruit fly Rhagoletis ... Abstract. Evidence suggests that the apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) is undergoing sympatric speciation (i.e., divergence without geographic isolation) in the process of shifting and adapting to a new host plant.Prior to the introduction of cultivated apples (Malus pumila) in North America, R. pomonella infested the fruit of native hawthorns (Crataegus spp.).

    Speciation in the apple maggot fly: a blend of vintages ...

    One of the textbook examples of recent speciation in sympatry is the apple maggot fly Rhagoletis pomonella, in which genetically differentiated host races feed on either hawthorn or apple. Three recent articles by Feder and collaborators show that the history of these host races is more complicated than was previously realized. Genes that differentiate races of flies that feed on either apple or hawthorn are located in chromosomal rearrangements. Speciation in the apple maggot fly: a blend of vintages? / Jiggins, CD; Bridle, JR. In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 19, 2004, p. 111 - 114. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article As the Worm Turns: Speciation and the Apple Maggot Fly by Martin G. Kelly Department of Biology Buffalo State College Hawthorn trees grow throughout North America and they produce a small fruit which is eaten by a small fly larva.

    Sympatric Speciation - Definition and Examples | Biology ...

    Sympatric speciation can be seen in many different types of organisms including bacteria, cichlid fish, and the apple maggot fly, but it can be difficult to tell when sympatric speciation is occurring or has occurred in nature. There have been some controversial examples of sympatric speciation documented in the literature. The apple maggot fly (Rhagoletis pomonela) mates and lays eggs on a specific host, originally Hawthorn. In 1864 Rhagoletis was found on apple trees that had been introduced Speciation is when two species become reproductively isolated, and over evolutionary time, become two new species. There are two main types of speciation: allopatric and sympatric. Allopatric means “different country”, and is defined by being repr...

    Speciation in the apple maggot fly: A blend of vintages ...

    The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a model system for sympatric speciation in phytophagous insects. The hawthorn fly (Rhagoletis pomonella), also known as the apple maggot fly, appears to be undergoing sympatric speciation. Different populations of hawthorn fly feed on different fruits. A distinct population emerged in North America in the 19th century some time after apples, a non-native species, were introduced. Only that speciation event would have taken longer than the current ongoing hawthorne/apple maggot fly event, because generations in apes are much longer than those of fruit flies.---More Info: All Hail the Apple Maggot! Rapid evolutionary change seen in fruit fly

    All Hail the Apple Maggot! - The New York Times

    “Evidence for inversion polymorphism related to sympatric host race formation in the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella.” Genetics 163: 939-953. For low levels of gene flow between the two populations, see Feder, J. L. et al. 1994. “Host fidelity is an effective premating barrier between sympatric races of the apple maggot fly ... Research on insect olfaction was initially conducted on moths, but now advances in equipment have allowed detailed neurological study in non-model systems, such as the apple maggot fly. The current article therefore offers a beginning, rather than a conclusion, to research involving Rhagoletis olfaction.

    The apple maggot fly—how an altered sense of smell could ...

    The apple maggot fly—how an altered sense of smell could drive the formation of new species. by National Centre for Biological Sciences Over a long enough period of time, an entirely new species might develop Hypothetical example New species. Sympatric Speciation Hawthorne American maggots fly Apple. Sympatric Speciation Example 1. Polyploidy in plants 2. Sexual selection in animals. Summary Allopatric Peripatric Parapatric Sympatric Original population Initial step of speciation Barrie New habitat New habitat Genetic ...

    Sympatric speciation in the apple maggot fly

    This channel is dedicated to students of biology, medicine, pharmacy, agriculture and other branches where biology science is studied. Also sympatric speciation can be observed in many different types of organisms such as the apple maggot fly, bacteria and cichlid fish; however it is usually not easy to tell when sympatric speciation has happened or is happening in nature. Some evidence suggests that sympatric speciation is occurring. Hawthorn flies mature later in the season and take longer to mature than apple flies; and there is little evidence of interbreeding (researchers have documented a 4-6% hybridization rate). The emergence of the new hawthorn fly is an example of evolution in progress.

    Anthropology final 2 Flashcards | Quizlet

    Start studying Anthropology final 2. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Nevertheless, sympatric speciation has been shown to have occurred in apple maggot flies (Rhagoletis pomonella), a parasitic insect that laid its eggs in the fruit of wild hawthorns (Crataegus) until one subset of the population began to lay its eggs in the fruit of domesticated apple trees (Malus domestica) that grew in the same area.That small group of apple maggot flies selected a different ...

    Speciation in the apple maggot fly: a blend of vintages ...

    The importance of speciation without the complete geographical separation of diverging populations (sympatric speciation) has become increasingly accepted. One of the textbook examples of recent speciation in sympatry is the apple maggot fly Rhagoletis pomonella, in which genetically differentiated host races feed on either hawthorn or apple ... Seasonality appears to be a major driver of speciation, particularly in plant-eating insects that specialize on hosts that are only available during limited seasonal windows. The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, provides a textbook example, historically feeding on native hawthorns in North America but now shifting to exploit apples, an introduced crop.

    Speciation in the apple maggot fly: a blend of vintages ...

    The textbook example of sympatric speciation is Rhagoletis pomonella, the apple maggot fly. Populations of this tephritid fly in northeastern USA switched from the ancestral host, hawthorn, to feed on introduced apples sometime during the mid-19th century. As apples and hawthorn commonly grow together within the ‘cruising distance’ of a fly ... The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella is a prime example of a species just beginning to diverge. These flies are native to the United States, and up until the discovery of the Americas by ... "Speciation By Hybridisation In Heliconius Butterflies" Jesús Mavárez, Camilo A. Salazar, Eldredge Bermingham, Christian Salcedo, Chris D. Jiggins and Mauricio Linares, Nature, 441: 868-871 (15th June 2006) I want to add a link to Cornell University biologist Allen MacNeill's blog article on the emergence of new species.

    Rhagoletis pomonella

    2. If not, and if apple maggot flies belong to their own species, what would be a biologically reasonable scenario for how the speciation occurred? Facts about Hawthorn and Apple Maggot Flies (Rhagoletis pomonella) The Organisms The apple maggot fly (Rhagoletis pomonella, Walsh) is native to eastern North America. It originally The apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella, is a model for sympatric speciation in progress4,5. Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) is the native host for R. pomonella in N. America5. But in the mid-1800s, a ... This case addresses that fundamental question by asking students to decide whether apple maggot flies are distinct as a species from hawthorn maggot flies. In making their decision, students examine the different models of speciation and consider the primary forces that effect evolutionary change. Developed for an advanced undergraduate course ...

    Apple Maggot Flies | A textbook example for evolution in action

    Kansas State University Greg Ragland studies apple maggot flies to chart pest evolution, help producers determine when to apply pesticides, and protect our food supply. Produced by Anthony ... A possible example of sympatric speciation is the apple maggot, an insect that lays its eggs inside the fruit of an apple, causing it to rot. As the apple falls from the tree, the maggots dig in the ground before emerging as flies several months later. The apple maggot originally laid its eggs in the fruit of a relative of the apple—a fruit ... Here, we examine the question of host plant-dependent competition for apple (Malus pumila)- and hawthorn (Crataegus mollis)-infesting larvae of the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) at a field site near Grant, Michigan, USA.

    Sympatric speciation - Evolution

    Unlike the previous modes, sympatric speciation does not require large-scale geographic distance to reduce gene flow between parts of a population. How could a randomly mating population reduce gene flow and speciate? Merely exploiting a new niche may automatically reduce gene flow with individuals exploiting the other niche. This may occasionally happen when, for example, herbivorous insects try out a new host plant. The apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella, is a model for sympatric speciation in progress. Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) is the native host for R. pomonella in N. Americas. But in the mid-1800s, a new population formed on introduced, domesticated apple (Malus pumila). Recent studies have conferred 'host race' status on apple flies as a potentially ... Hannah Kim AP Biology February 17, 2010 Speciation and the Apple Maggot Fly 1. What species concept should be used in this case? Interbreed and reproduce healthy, fertile offspring. The two species follow sympatric speciation, where two closely related organisms overlap in terms of geographical range. Both the flies inhabit the hawthorn trees, but the apple maggot flies have an advantage ...

    Speciation: Sympatric, Allopatric, and Parapatric ...

    Here ia link to an article fully explaining the sympatric speciation in the apple maggot fly: Speciation and the Apple Maggot Fly. In a somewhat similar scenario that also does not necessitate geographic isolation, parapatric speciation can occur. In parapatric speciation there is no specific extrinsic barrier to gene flow. The population is ... Probably the best-known example of sympatric speciation is the divergence of Rhagoletis pomeonella, the maggot fly (Feder et al., 1988, 1990). This species has recently diverged into two subspecies due to the introduction of apple trees in the northeastern United States, where hawthorn trees were native.

    The rise of the apple maggot fly – how an altered sense of ...

    The flies are textbook examples for the process of sympatric speciation, a process by which new species evolve in the same geographic region from a common ancestor species. The two races of flies maintain separate populations on the basis of preferred host fruits, which they detect through smells – apple flies prefer apple scents, while hawthorn flies prefer hawthorn fruit smells. In America Rhagoletis pomonella, the apple maggot fly, originally fed on and its larval stage lived within fruits of hawthorn which is also a member of the Rosaceae.However soon after apple trees were introduced - apparently in about 1800 - some of these flies laid eggs on and lived in apple fruits.

    Speciation in the apple maggot fly: a blend of vintages?

    patric speciation) has become increasingly accepted. One of the textbook examples of recent speciation in sympatry is the apple maggot fly Rhagoletis pomonella, in which genetically differentiated host races feed on either hawthorn or apple. Three recent articles by Feder and collaborators show that the history of these host The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella is a prime example of a species just beginning to diverge. These flies are native to the United States, and up until the discovery of the Americas by ...

    Lesson-10:Example of Sympatric Speciation - Unacademy

    Over a long enough period of time, an entirely new species might develop Hypothetical example New species. Sympatric Speciation Hawthorne American maggots fly Apple. Sympatric Speciation Example 1. Polyploidy in plants 2. Sexual selection in animals. Summary Allopatric Peripatric Parapatric Sympatric Original population Initial step of speciation Barrie New habitat New habitat Genetic ... speciation, which was first coined by biologist Orator F. Cook, refers to the process of evolution through which new species arise. In nature there are four different means of speciation: allopatric, parapatric, sympatric, and peripatric.

    Case Study: As the Worm Turns Speciation and the Apple Fly ...

    Case Study: As the Worm Turns Speciation and the Apple Fly Maggot Introduction: Hawthorn trees grow throughout North America and they produce a small fruit which is eaten by a small fly larva. In 1864, apple growers discovered an unknown maggot had started feeding on apples. sympatric speciation example. apple maggot fly. apple maggot fly. native to US hawthorn, lays eggs in hawthorn, europeans brought apples to US, some switched to apples -- individual flies tend to look for mates and lay eggs around same types of fruits they were born (temporal variation) apple maggot fly is an example of _____ speciation by host shift. speciation by host shift. tight species ...



    Unlike the previous modes, sympatric speciation does not require large-scale geographic distance to reduce gene flow between parts of a population. How could a randomly mating population reduce gene flow and speciate? Merely exploiting a new niche may automatically reduce gene flow with individuals exploiting the other niche. This may occasionally happen when, for example, herbivorous insects try out a new host plant. The textbook example of sympatric speciation is Rhagoletis pomonella, the apple maggot fly. Populations of this tephritid fly in northeastern USA switched from the ancestral host, hawthorn, to feed on introduced apples sometime during the mid-19th century. As apples and hawthorn commonly grow together within the ‘cruising distance’ of a fly . One of the textbook examples of recent speciation in sympatry is the apple maggot fly Rhagoletis pomonella, in which genetically differentiated host races feed on either hawthorn or apple. Three recent articles by Feder and collaborators show that the history of these host races is more complicated than was previously realized. Genes that differentiate races of flies that feed on either apple or hawthorn are located in chromosomal rearrangements. The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a model system for sympatric speciation in phytophagous insects. Sympatric speciation can be seen in many different types of organisms including bacteria, cichlid fish, and the apple maggot fly, but it can be difficult to tell when sympatric speciation is occurring or has occurred in nature. Samsung galaxy f super phone gsm. This channel is dedicated to students of biology, medicine, pharmacy, agriculture and other branches where biology science is studied. Kansas State University Greg Ragland studies apple maggot flies to chart pest evolution, help producers determine when to apply pesticides, and protect our food supply. Produced by Anthony . 2. If not, and if apple maggot flies belong to their own species, what would be a biologically reasonable scenario for how the speciation occurred? Facts about Hawthorn and Apple Maggot Flies (Rhagoletis pomonella) The Organisms The apple maggot fly (Rhagoletis pomonella, Walsh) is native to eastern North America. It originally patric speciation) has become increasingly accepted. One of the textbook examples of recent speciation in sympatry is the apple maggot fly Rhagoletis pomonella, in which genetically differentiated host races feed on either hawthorn or apple. Three recent articles by Feder and collaborators show that the history of these host Hybridization may be an important process interjecting variation into insect populations enabling host plant shifts and the origin of new economic pests. Here, we examine whether hybridization between the native snowberry-infesting fruit fly Rhagoletis . The flies are textbook examples for the process of sympatric speciation, a process by which new species evolve in the same geographic region from a common ancestor species. The two races of flies maintain separate populations on the basis of preferred host fruits, which they detect through smells – apple flies prefer apple scents, while hawthorn flies prefer hawthorn fruit smells.

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